In Villa

This tutorial is still under construction

This is the first translation. Below is the Latin text. Click on the link beneath for the correct translation, and the link beneath that for an annotation. The annotation goes into more detail about each sentence.

servus in villa laborat. servus vinum portat. servus puellas audit et puellae servum vident. servus puellas amat et puellae servum amant. puellae servum laudant. puer puellas amat. puer puellas et servum videt. puer puellae e villa trahit. puellae puerum non amant.

Here, the sentences tend to follow the same structure:

Subject Object Verb.

In this annotation, the easiest way to annotate it is with a key:

Color Role in sentence
Red Nominative noun
Blue Accusative noun
Green Verb

servus in villa laborat.
The slave is working in the house.

The first sentence may seem incorrect when you first look at it. You may wonder why it is "in villa" rather than "in villam". The reason is this: after "in" the noun goes into another case called the "ablative". You don't need to know about this yet, but the ablative is another case similar to the nominative and accusative cases. The ablative form of "villa" is simply "villa".

servus vinum portat.
The slave is carrying the wine.

Here, the sentence is much simpler with the familiar subject-object-verb structure. Like most of these sentences, the subject is at the start, the object is in the middle, and the verb is at the end. Notice how you can tell that the subject is singular in two ways:

  • "servus" is nominative singular, so there must only be one slave.
  • "portat" has a "-t" ending, so it must be third person singular, hence it means he/she/it carries (i.e. one thing carries) rather than they carry

servus puellas audit et puellae servum vident.
The slave hears the girls and the girls see the slave.

This sentence may appear to be hard because of its length. However, a good technique when trying to translate these sentences is to split the sentence into two where the "et" (meaning "and") is.

In the first half, the word "puellas" is accusative plural, so this means "girls" rather than girl".

In the second half, "puellae" is the nominative plura, so this time, the girls are the subject, not the object. This time, the verb "vident" has an "-nt" ending, so the verb translates as "they see" i.e. "the girls see".

servus puellas amat et puellae servum amant. puellae servum laudant. puer puellas amat. puer puellas et servum videt. puer puellae e villa trahit. puellae puerum non amant.//

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